ghost orchid

Bearded Grass Pink, Early Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)

Part of the Florida's Native and Naturalized Orchids Website

Classification:
  Kingdom:   Plantae - Plants
    Subkingdom:   Tracheobionta - Vascular Plants
      Superdivision:   Spermatophyta - Seed plants
        Division:   Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
          Class:   Liliopsida - Monocotyledons
            Subclass:   Liliidae - Subclass containing lily and orchid relatives
              Order:   Orchidales - Orchid order
                Family:   Orchidaceae - Orchid Family
                  Subfamily:   Epidendroideae -
                    Tribe:   Arethuseae - Arethusoids
                      Subtribe:   Bletiinae - Bletia and related


Distribution Map:
Distribution map for Bearded Grass Pink, Early Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Description:
Summary: Small (typically less than 6 inches--15 cm) tall terrestrial with one-inch (2.5 cm) flowers typically opening semi-sequentially up the raceme. Flower color ranges from white to deep magenta (with a recent coerulean form--fma. lilacinus--discovered in southeastern Georgia). Plant consisting of a small corm with a single, narrow leaf in addition to the flowering stem on mature plants.

Common Name: Bearded Grass Pink, Early Grass Pink

Habitat: Moist, open pinelands, wet prairies, wet roadsides and ditches.

Flowering season: March through April (peaking in March)

Images:
 
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)
Bearded Grass Pink (Calopogon barbatus)

Description:
 

This is one of the earliest orchids to appear in spring in moist, acidic bogs, preceded only by Listera australis. The flowers are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) across and range in color from white to deep pink, but are typically a medium pink. Recently a violet-blue form (fma. lilacina) was discovered in southeastern Georgia. The flowers open sequentially up the spike with two or three open flowers at once being typical. In the related Calopogon multiflorus, many more flowers will be open simultaneously. Pollination of this flower happens in a similar fashion as Calopogon tuberosus.

This is one of the more common orchid species within the state, however, common is a relative term, as the suitable habitat for this species is turned into yet another golf course, strip mall, or housing subdivision. Habitat loss to human development is perhaps the greatest threat to all things wild in Florida (except for those few species which seem to adapt to man-made environments fairly well)

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